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In October of 2004, RealityNewsOnline.com interviewed Cycle 4’s Julie Titus. The interview summarizes her experience in the top model house, who she thought was “drama free” and what she plans to do in the future. Here is the text from the article (written by Phil Kural):

“At the Final 14, Everyone Became a Diva!” – An Interview with America’s Next Top Model 3’s Julie

Julie was the third girl cut this season on America’s Next Top Model. In this interview, Julie has no problem explaining why she thinks she was cut, what she thought about the whole “Cassie eating disorder” fiasco, not to mention how her mom kept a scrapbook!

I have to admit, when I previewed the girls before the season started, I thought Julie was going to be a bitch. Not the case – in fact, she ended up being one of the most fun, real girls of the bunch. Very easy to talk to, Julie had no problem dishing the dirt on how all the girls changed, how she pretty much knew she was the one going home, and whether or not she would do it all again.

RealityNewsOnline: I have to know, do you regret saying you wanted to get into manufacturing?

Julie: No, not at all. You know what? I was honest with myself and I said what I would have said in any other situation. Of course, it was chopped up on the editing floor, but there isn’t anything that I said that I would have taken back. They made it look like I didn’t want to be a model at all, and that wasn’t the case.

RNO: Did you ever want to be a model in the first place, or were you just using the show as a platform to pursue something else?

Julie: I do enjoy modeling, and definitely wanted to start my career in modeling. However, I don’t think there is anything wrong with wanting to expand after that, and that’s what I wanted to do. I could always go back and forth with modeling and something else – Tyra and Janice are doing it now!

RNO: You came across as one of the most “real” girls. Was that your intention?

Julie: That definitely was my intention. I wore sweats and people were calling me saying, “I can’t believe you wore sweats on national TV.” Well, that’s me! I wasn’t going to punish myself or be embarrassed – I’m very comfortable with who I am, and I’d be uncomfortable being anyone but myself.

RNO: If you had the choice and knew what you did now about the whole process of the show, would you apply again?

Julie: You know, I’m really not sure if I would do it again or not. One time might have been good enough. It was a great experience, but I’m not so sure I could deal with the havoc all over again.

RNO: What was your favorite part of the whole experience?

Julie: Definitely going to Jamaica. Also though, I loved going to the party and meeting all those top designers in the business. Really, the whole experience was just a blessing that I’m glad I got to experience.

RNO: From what you saw, was Amanda changing from the whole experience?

Julie: No, not really. The thing was, all the girls in the final 14 turned into a diva, excluding myself of course, ha ha! It was just funny that everyone got offensive on Amanda when she made that funny pose after her hair was done. I mean, there was no reason for her to go all Zoolander in the salon. She was just trying to be cute, but came off conceited and corny.

RNO: In your own opinion, would you say that Cassie had an eating disorder that needed to be fixed?

Julie: No, not at all. The whole thing was blown way out of proportion. She told Amanda and I that, years back, she would eat something, feel sick, and throw it up later. She couldn’t even remember the last time that she did it! I know girls that do have eating disorders and it’s not something to laugh at. Amanda didn’t have an eating disorder, it was just edited that way, and some of the girls just took it too far.

RNO: What did your family think about your time on the show?

Julie: My mom wasn’t thrilled with me being on the show at first, but, once it began, she became very excited and actually started to keep a scrap book every time I turned up in a magazine, newspaper or

RNO: Did you think you were going to be cut? If not, who did you think was going?

Julie: Oh yeah, I knew it was going to be either myself or Kelle, and when it was the two of us left, I had a gut feeling that it was going to be me. I just didn’t like that they got rid of me for saying I wanted to be in manufacturing. I wanted to be a model too, and just because Kelle had this ultimate dream of being a model one day, it was me that ended up getting cut.

RNO: Which of the girls seemed the most “drama free” to you?

Julie: Wow, that’s pretty tough and I’m not really sure. Cassie kept to herself most of the time, and I actually respected that about her. Jennipher was so funny, and stayed pretty drama free as well. Kristi and Nicole managed to stay out of any drama whatsoever!

RNO: Is there anything about yourself that you learned from this whole experience?

Julie: The one thing I really learned was a sense of self. I realized that in order to be happy, I have to be true to myself first. Besides, how am I supposed to be happy unless if I don’t act like anyone but myself!

RNO: You said several times that you were trying to represent Indian women. Do you feel that you did that properly?

Julie: I’m not really sure about that one either. I was there to break a mold and show that Indian women can do more than what people stereotype them to do. I think I did that. I completed my first goal, and that was to show people what I’m capable of. Many of my friends called and asked if my parents disowned me because of the whole thing, and I had to tell them no – they knew I wanted to do this and supported me in my decision.

RNO: What’s the one thing that you weren’t able to portray on camera that you wish you would have?

Julie: I really wish they would have showed more of my humor. That time at the party when I imitated my mom was not the first time I did that. Thank goodness my mom was a good sport about it all. She tried to tell me, “I don’t talk like that!” but I had to inform her that she really does, ha ha!

RNO: Do you plan on continuing to try to make it in the modeling industry or are you moving on?

Julie: Yes, I definitely plan to try to continue modeling. I’m young enough to still do it and definitely think I have an advantage over many other models, especially the other girls that were on the show. Every one of those girls it’s easy to say that, “Oh, I’ve seen someone that looks like her before.” It’s not that way with me – I think I’m unique looking and still have a chance to make it in the industry.

RNO: Is there anything you would like to say or add to your fans or fans of the show? Maybe something funny we didn’t get to see?

Julie: To all my fans and fans of the show – thank you so much for all the support that you have given to me and the show in general. I kept it real by staying Indian, and hopefully this won’t be the last time you see or hear from me!

RNO: Thanks again, Julie!

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

Source: RealityNewsOnline.com
Photo:  CW

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In October of 2004, Reality Shack.com interviewed Cycle 3’s Julie Titus. The interview discusses her future plans, what she was thinking when she told Tyra her true career plans and the most valuable thing she learned while on Top Model. Here is the text from the article (written by “Aurora”):

Interview With Julie Ann Titus of America’s Next Top Model 3

After telling Tyra and the judges that she wanted to learn about modelling so she could become an apparel manufacturer, Julie was eliminated from the competition. Here, she explains her comments, gives her impression of the whole Cassie/bulimia thing, and more!

Hi Julie! Last night you said that you were using modelling as a launch pad for a different career. Could you explain your comments in a bit more detail please?

Wow! Okay, what I actually said was that I wanted to learn more about modelling because I wanted to get into apparel manufacturing AND also modelling. I do want to become a model! Of course I want to learn as much as I can about the industry so I can accomplish both of these things.

Did you realize the moment those words left your lips that you were a goner?

No, that was the smartest move ever! Seriously, it was like I heard myself say I wanted to get into manufacturing and I was thinking, “Why am I talking? Why did I say that?” I didn’t want to cover anything up and I was trying to be honest, but I guess that’s not what they wanted to hear.

What was the most valuable thing you learned while on the show?

I gained a true sense of self from the show. You know, you just have to stick to being you. That’s what got me on the show in the first place, being myself.

Do you plan to continue modelling now?

Yeah, I do. I still plan to do both modelling and manufacturing.

What are your thoughts on the situation with Cassie and her eating disorder?

Oh, that whole thing was totally blown out of proportion. Amanda is great you know, she’s the free-spirited, hippy woman in the group. But Cassie wasn’t looking for a counsellor, she just wanted to talk.

I was part of that conversation – Cassie talked to Amanda and me about it. And she said that sometimes when she goes to bed, if she feels too full she goes and throws up because she can’t sleep. I’m disappointed that Amanda said anything to the other girls. I know she was trying to help Cassie and not hurt her, because she’s just not like that. But I understand where Cassie is coming from. She wants to be thin, and I don’t think she really has an ‘eating disorder’.

You seemed disappointed with your makeover. Was there anything you wanted them to do differently?

I wasn’t disappointed! I laughed because I was saying that they’re not doing too much with me, but then I realized that it was a compliment! All the other girls were getting worked over, but I didn’t have to have that much work done.

And you know, someone said on the show that I only have one look. Well that’s the only look I need!

For sure, and you don’t want to come out looking all weird with bleached-blond hair or what-have-you.

Yeah, I don’t want to be the Indian RuPaul!

What advice would you like to pass along to other young East Indian girls who want to pursue modelling?

Go for it! Indians are some of the most beautiful people in the world; why not show that off?

Thanks for your time today Julie, and best of luck to you!

Thank you!

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

Source: Reality Shack.com
Photo: CWTroy Ward

In November of 2004, SepiaMutiny.com interviewed Cycle 3’s Julie Titus. The interview summarizes her experience with designer Anand Jon while on America’s Next Top Model. Here is the text from the article (written by Ismat Sarah Mangla):

Julie Ann Titus thinks Anand Jon smells

Goddess bless Nirali Magazine, for being so gosh-darned entertainin’. You MUST peep this excerpt from the excellent website’s interview with our favourite female reality show reject— it seems that Julie Ann Titus of America’s Next Top Model fame has some memorable opinions on certain fashion designers:

You said you specifically want to do men’s apparel. Why?

Everybody goes so crazy with women’s clothes—it’s not even fashion anymore, it’s costume. I just think guys look better in their clothes. My dad always dressed up in really nice suits for work. I thought, guys should wear suits all the time. And I want to incorporate Indian style, too. I was so excited when I met designer Anand Jon on the show.

What was that experience like?

I saw him walk into the room, and I went crazy. I mean, I’ve studied his work. But he was an interesting character. I wouldn’t want to hang out with him, that’s for sure.

Why not?

I respect him as a fashion designer. But he was very, very rude to some of the girls. He seemed so boring to me. I asked him what part of India he was from, and he asked me, what part of India are you from? So I said I’m from Kerala, and he looked at me kind of crazy. He’s Malayalee, too. He asked me if I knew any Malayalam, and I said I only knew the bad words. Then he says, “Shouldn’t you be serving us or something?” [Titus and the other cast members had to serve four of the girls who won that week’s model challenge.] So I walked away, cursing at him in Malayalam. He said, “Oh, so now you know it?” And he smelled bad. The girls looked at me and were like, are all Indian guys like this? And I was like, nope, just this fool right here. Later, my parents told me that they know him through family friends.

So what’s next for you, now that you won’t be cursing out fashion designers in Malayalam?

I’m back in Kent, finishing up my associate of arts degree. But I’m still pursuing modeling at the same time. I actually have been talking with a modeling agency in Washington—it’s supposed to be the best agency in Seattle.

So no regrets about doing the show?

Oh yeah, it was an interesting experience. I had a good time.

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

Source: SepiaMutiny.com
Photo: CWDaniel Garriga

In November of 2004, NiraliMagazine.com interviewed Cycle 3’s Julie Titus. The interview summarizes why she auditioned for the show, how strongly she identifies with the Indian Culture and why she wants to go into men’s fashions. Here is the text from the article (written by Ismat Sarah Mangla):

Model Behavior

Supermodel Tyra Banks and her crew are back on UPN this fall, scouring the country forAmerica’s Next Top Model. This season, the band of model hopefuls included 19-year-old Julie Titus, an Indian American from Kent, Washington. Titus was eliminated from the competition in the third episode for being a little bit too honest (she confessed to Banks that she had other aspirations besides modeling), so we caught up with her to get the behind-the-scenes scoop.

What prompted you to try out for the show? Had you done any modeling before you tried out for the show?
No, I actually did a pageant before, but that was something my mom forced me into.

My best friend had watched the first season of the show, and he called me and harassed me to do it. I tried out for him. Later, I found out that my local radio station was having a contest. The first five people they picked for the contest would be the first five people to audition for the show. I was picked. A couple of days later, I got a call that I made it past the first round. I get a second call [that] I had to videotape myself. A week later, I found out I got to go to LA for the show.

I want to break the stereotypes of what people think of Indian women or Indians in general.

Do you think the show was true to the reality of what happened?
A lot of it was accurate. A couple of things here and there were blown out of proportion—like Cassie’s bulimia. It wasn’t that big of a deal. They made it sound worse than it really was.

You said one of your goals was to create a new image for Indian women. What did you mean?
I just want to break the stereotypes of what people think of Indian women or Indians in general. The categories are mostly being a doctor, engineer, or having something to do with computers–especially because a lot of times that’s what our parents want us to do.

My mom thought I was doing some kind of porn scam!


Speaking of parents, how did your family feel about you going on the show?

Oh, everybody was against it. They said stuff like, “Modeling is such an unstable career” and “It’s like you’re doing a porno.”

My mom thought I was doing some kind of porn scam!

So they didn’t really know much about the show?
They had no idea. When I told them I was trying out for a show, they were like, what is this show, what’s it all about? My mom knew who Tyra Banks was, so I explained what the show was about. My dad said, what is this, a black model search?

So how did you convince them it was a good idea?
I told them if I could use this to become a model and get myself set, I could incorporate what I do with my main goal, which is to get into apparel manufacturing. They knew I’d do what I wanted to do, anyway.

So they got over it, eventually?

Well, they didn’t like some of it. We did this ad in People magazine for Lee Jeans where we were topless. They weren’t cool with that.

I’m a big ABCD. I don’t speak a lick of Malayalam.

But my parents are a lot more liberal than some other parents. At first, they were against me doing this. Then all of a sudden, I called my mom from the show one day, and she was like, “Hiiii, my famous daughter!” [Titus mimics a thick Indian accent.] I was like, “Wait, who is this?”

You’re Malayalee. Do you identify with Indian culture?

Actually, I’m a big ABCD when it comes to that. I don’t speak a lick of Malayalam. I am a big fan of the food, though.

What’s your favorite Indian food? From the show, it seems like you’re a bit of a foodie.
Biryani. Yeah, they have clips of me on the Internet always eating. [Laughs.] I was chomping away. Sometimes I didn’t even have basic table manners!

The show really focused on you being Indian. Do you think they did that at the expense of showcasing your personality?
I was kind of mad that they didn’t show more of my personality. I’m just this goofy, funny girl. The basis of all my humor is my mother. That’s the one thing I had–I’d start talking like my mom [imitates a stereotypical desi accent]. So the girls gave me the nickname “Curry Mama.”

But I’m just goofy. Like, that whole time, with Janice, when she had a comment to say about me, I wanted to say, “I see your Botox moving, but I can’t hear the words coming out.” I was seriously biting my tongue. I guess I didn’t want to seem bitchy on TV. (Laughs.)

I saw the other divas around me, and they were like, “Ooh, where’s the camera?” and did a little dance in front of it. I just kind of laughed and thought, “I’ll sit in the background and watch you make a fool of everyone.”

“But my parents are a lot more liberal than some other parents. At first, they were against me doing this. Then all of a sudden, I called my mom from the show one day, and she was like, “Hiiii, my famous daughter!”

You were really rocking clothes that mixed Indian and Western sensibilities. Is that your style?
Yeah, I love wearing Indian jewelry. I’ll wear a regular T-shirt with some bling. It is kind of what my style is. When I threw the tika on, I just felt like it.

What was up with some of the “Kama Sutra” comments you received during the swimsuit shoot in Jamaica?
That kind of annoyed me. They were saying “Work it, girl, work it like the Kama Sutra.” J. Alexander was going off, saying, come on, do those Hindu poses, and I was like, “I’m not Hindu.” But I knew I was going to get those stereotypes. If someone crossed over that line that wasn’t OK, then I would have stepped up and said something. Curry Mama’s gonna kick some a**. (Laughs.) I did get another comment about being Indian. One of the girls said, “Let’s all be honest, and say what we felt when we first met each other.” So Toccara says to me, “Julie, can I tell you something? I don’t think you’re going to be America’s Next Top Model.” I asked why, and she said, “I don’t think America’s ready for an Indian model yet.” I just walked out to get something to eat. Two other girls came up to me and said, are you going to kick her a**? I was shocked that she said that.


You did get booted, but it was because you told the judges you wanted to break into modeling as a stepping stone to starting your own apparel manufacturing company. Do you regret being so honest?

I wish I could have rephrased it. But the bottom line is, I would have said the same thing. It just tripped them out that I had other aspirations than just being a model.

You said you specifically want to do men’s apparel. Why?

Everybody goes so crazy with women’s clothes–it’s not even fashion anymore, it’s costume. I just think guys look better in their clothes. My dad always dressed up in really nice suits for work. I thought, guys should wear suits all the time. And I want to incorporate Indian style, too. I was so excited when I met designer Anand Jon on the show.

What was that experience like?
I saw him walk into the room, and I went crazy. I mean, I’ve studied his work. But he was an interesting character. I wouldn’t want to hang out with him, that’s for sure.

“I was kind of mad that America’s Next Top Model didn’t show more of my personality. I’m just this goofy, funny girl.”

Why not?
I respect him as a fashion designer. But he was very, very rude to some of the girls.

He seemed so boring to me. I asked him what part of India he was from, and he asked me, what part of India are you from? So I said I’m from Kerala, and he looked at me kind of crazy. He’s Malayalee, too. He asked me if I knew any Malayalam, and I said I only knew the bad words. Then he says, “Shouldn’t you be serving us or something?” [Titus and the other cast members had to serve four of the girls who won that week’s model challenge.] So I walked away, cursing at him in Malayalam. He said, “Oh, so now you know it?”

And he smelled bad. The girls looked at me and were like, are all Indian guys like this? And I was like, nope, just this fool right here. Later, my parents told me that they know him through family friends.

So what’s next for you, now that you won’t be cursing out fashion designers in Malayalam?
I’m back in Kent, finishing up my associate of arts degree. But I’m still pursuing modeling at the same time. I actually have been talking with a modeling agency in Washington–it’s supposed to be the best agency in Seattle.

So no regrets about doing the show?

Oh yeah, it was an interesting experience. I had a good time.

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

Source: NiraliMagazine.com
Photo: CWDaniel Garriga

In October of 2004, GirlPosse.com interviewed Cycle 3’s Julie Titus. The interview summarizes her experience in the Top Model house, as well as her feelings regarding the other girls. Here is the text from the article (written by Girl Posse Staff):

The Interview

The next time you’re walking down the road and see someone that looks just like that Julie girl from America’s Next Top Model – look closer. It may just be her.

“I feel weird. People recognize me. Well, they say ‘you look exactly like that girl from Top Model.’ Hmm. Maybe it is because Iam that girl.” Julie laughs.

Julie, best known for her Indian heritage and her deep voice (“I sound like a man!”), was the 3rd girl to be eliminated. After talking with her, it seemed like she was ready to go.

Girlposse: Were you glad to leave?
Julie: Yes. In some sense I thought if I wasn’t what they were looking for…. Yes.

Although she had never modeled before, Julie had been in a pageant “I was Miss Teen Seattle. My mom wanted me to be girlier. She would chase me through the house with make-up.” Despite her mom’s best efforts, Julie may have won, but didn’t become girlie.

Her journey to the Top 12 was encouraged by her best friend, who “watched since day 1. He called and said ‘there’s a show made for you. You have to be on the show.’ I wasn’t sure.” After much debate she “moved by to Seattle and said I’d see what it was about.”

Being chosen put her in a house with 11 other women (“I’m not a fan of living in an estrogen house. I have… all my friends are guy friends. I was dealing with all those stupid girl things. I was annoyed with a lot of the girls.”), cameras (“The TV thing really grew on you after a while. You would have a conversation, turn, and there’s a camera right there.”) and a competition (“The competition itself – craziness.”).

And what does she think of the women remaining in the house? We asked her to describe each of them with one word:

Amanda: “hippy”
Ann – “stupid”
Cassie – “genuine”
Eva – “Diva”
Jennipher – “funny”
Kelle – “annoying. No – whitegirl-ism”
Kristi – “real”
Nicole – “hilarious”
Norelle – “innocent. No no. She’s not. What am I saying? Fun.”
Toccara – “loud”
Yaya – “regal”

And if she had to guess how they would describe her? “Indian”

We have heard from other eliminees that Julie was extremely funny, and a lot of fun to be around. Did she wish they had shown that more? “I really, really wish they would have. I wish the girls would’ve been happier to be there versus all the cattiness.”

In her elimination episode, all of the girls received a makeover. Some were drastic, Julie’s wasn’t. At first she felt a little cheated. But that feeling quickly went away. “I think… I liked how I looked. Everyone’s getting stuff done and yeah, at first I wondered why I wasn’t. But [after] they didn’t look like them. I thought maybe I didn’t have to change to look like a model.

Julie wants to be remembered for “my goofiness and as someone that is genuine”. But she will probably be remembered most for her elimination. When asked why she wanted to be a model, Julie replied that she was using it as a stepping stone to get into the business… as a manufacturer.

Girlposse: Any regrets?

Julie: No. Because it’s truly …. I could’ve worded it better. I wanted to be a model and then get into apparel manufacturing.

Would she do it again? “No. Too much big brother watching me.”

So who does she think will be eliminated next? “I hope Kelle gets out of here.”

The winner? “The prettiest.”

What’s next for “Curry Mama”? “I’m going to finish school. Hopefully move to New York.” This business major has great plans to see her career take off.

Final note to her fans: “Keep it real.” 

Julie’s Beauty Tip

The only thing you need in life is bronzer.

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

Source: GirlPosse.com
Photo: CWDaniel Garriga

To learn more about Cycle 3‘s Julie Titus, visit her bio page here.

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